Heirloom Vegetable Seed Kit 11 Varieties-NON-GMO

5/5

$15.97

Sometimes we find ourselves so busy or overwhelmed with life that deciding which seeds to buy becomes a monumental task. There are so many to choose from! 500 different types of tomatoes, 40 cucumber options, how does a new gardener pick just one? We understand because we went through the same struggle. This kit eliminates all the guesswork and turns a challenging chore into a simple decision. These eleven NON-GMO heirloom vegetable seeds are the perfect addition to your garden.

Our vegetable variety kit includes all the seeds needed to start a home garden and start you on your journey to self-reliance. By growing your own vegetables, you know exactly what you are feeding your family. These days, there are too many lawsuits against manufacturers we thought were safe. Cut out the chemicals and pesticides and grow your own food, safe for you and your family.

MORE SEEDS THAN THE COMPETITION- OVER 4800 SEEDS!

Includes the following Heirloom Vegetable Seeds By Count:

*Seed counts are approximate based on weight.

Black Seeded Simpson Leaf Lettuce– 2200Calabrese Broccoli- 300
National Pickling Cucumber– 50/td>White Sweet Spanish Onion– 200
Black Beauty Summer Squash– 25Imperator 58 Carrot– 1750
Ace 55 Tomato– 200Golden Bantam Corn– 45
Sugar Snap Peas– 25Bush Lima Beans– 15
California Wonder Bell Pepper- 50

Buy 2 or More Of Any Seed Kit and Save!

QuantityDiscounted Price Per Item
2$15.17
3$14.37
4$13.57

*Quantity refers to discounted items (products with discount) total quantity on cart.

Free Shipping

Within The United States

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

No Questions Asked

100% Natural

Chemical & Pesticide Free

Weight.2 lbs
Dimensions8 × 5 × .5 in

How do I plant the seeds?

Lettuce

This cool-weather crop is best planted in Spring or Fall. Most lettuce varieties grow best in temperatures ranging from 40-70F. Temperatures above 75F inhibit germination. Seeds can be started indoors or planted directly in the garden. Sow in full sun or partial shade. Lightly broadcast seeds over damp soil. Cover them with 1/8″-1/4″ soil. In 2-10 days, they will germinate. After they are a few inches tall, thin the seedlings to 10-12″ apart so they have room to grow. Harvest leaves individually or cut the entire head. Leaves will continue sprouting with regular harvesting. Lettuce is an excellent container plant. For a successive harvest, plant seeds every three weeks.

 

Radish

Plant radish seeds in the cool weather of early spring or fall. Radishes grow quickly and produce abundantly. Start them in the garden as soon as the ground can be worked. Sow seeds 1/2″ deep in rows 12″ apart. Seeds can be broadcast and thinned later or placed 1-2″ apart. Be careful not to plant them too closely, or the radishes will not grow large. Always plant radishes in full sun. Plants that are shaded focus on developing bigger foliage and will produce small radishes. Radishes will grow in containers that are at least 6″ deep, allowing for the roots to grow. Plant new crops every 2-3 weeks for successive harvests.

 

Spinach & Arugula

Plant these cold-hardy varieties in early spring as soon as the ground can be worked. Plant again in fall when the weather begins to cool. Many types are somewhat frost-resistant. Sow seeds in full or partial sun. Broadcast seeds over the ground, then cover them with 1/4″ soil. When they have reached 2-3″ tall, thin the seedlings, so they are 10-12″ apart. Do not neglect thinning or the plants won’t have enough space to grow. Harvest leaves when they are a minimum of 4-5″ tall. Harvest individual leaves, or cut back the entire plant. They will grow back. Leaves become bitter if allowed to grow too large. Plant new seeds every 2-3 weeks for a continuous harvest. Spinach and arugula grow well in containers.

 

Broccoli

Start seeds indoors 4-6 weeks before the last frost or direct-seed outdoors as soon as the ground can be worked. For direct seeding, sow seeds in rows 36″ apart. Plant them 1/2″ deep and spaced 12-24″ apart. For transplants, move to the garden 2-3 weeks before the last frost. In warmer climates, plant broccoli mid-summer, so plants are growing in the cool weather of fall. Hot weather prompts plants to bolt and stop producing. Harvest heads when they are 3-4” diameter. Larger heads lose flavor.

 

Cucumber

Start seeds indoors 3 weeks before the last frost, or direct-seed when all danger of frost is gone. Soil temperature must be above 70F, or the plants will not thrive. Plant in full sun. Ensure plants receive 1-2″ of water per week, or the fruit will be bitter. Direct seeding bush varieties: Sow seeds 1″ deep, 2-3″ apart, in rows 1-2′ apart.

Direct seeding vining varieties: Sow seeds in mounds, 2-3 seeds in each one, and spaced 1-2′ apart. Set up trellises for the vines when they are still seedlings. Roots are shallow and easily disturbed. Weed cautiously. Vines are prolific, as is fruit production. When plant is producing, pick every day to encourage more to grow. A consistent harvest produces more fruit.  Cucumbers grow well in containers.

 

Onion

Onions have an especially long growing season. Plant them in early Spring for a Fall harvest. Sow seeds indoors 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Plant seeds 1/4″ deep in damp soil. They need cool soil to germinate, temperatures around 50F. When all danger of frost has passed, transplant seedlings in the garden 4-6″ apart and in rows 12-18″ apart.

Direct-seed onions thickly in rows 1/2″ deep. When they are 2-3″ tall, thin to 6″ apart. When the tops turn yellow and start to fall over, the onions are ready for harvesting. Onions can withstand light frost.

 

 

 

Tomatoes

Start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before the last frost or direct-seed after all danger of frost has passed. Most varieties demand a long growing season and benefit from an indoor start. Sow seeds 1/2” deep in individual containers. When all danger of frost has passed, transplant to the garden. Plant in full sun. Plant at least 2′ apart, in rows spaced 2-3′ apart. Arrange trellises, stakes, or cages around plants when young to avoid damaging branches or roots later. Keep fruit off the ground, or it will rot. Water consistently. Inconsistent watering results in cracked, burst, or uneven fruit. Tomatoes grow well in containers.

 

Corn

Always plant at least 16 to ensure pollination. A 4×4 block is ideal. Do not grow in rows unless it is a large planting (40+). Pollination depends on close proximity. Plant in full sun. Sow seeds indoors 3-4 weeks before the last frost. Plant 1” deep in individual containers. Transplant when the outdoor soil temperature is above 65F. For direct-seeding, wait two weeks after the last frost to ensure ideal temperatures. Sow seeds 1 1/2” deep, 4-6” apart. Plant more than needed. When the seedlings are 4” tall, thin them to 8-12” apart, removing the smaller ones. Weed carefully, corn has shallow roots.

 

Peas

Sow seeds outdoors as soon as the ground can be worked in Spring. The soil should be at least 45F. Often this is 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Choose a spot that will remain unaffected by melting snow or heavy spring rain. Plant in full sun. Plant seeds 1” deep along a trellis or wall, spacing them 2” apart. Arrange rows 12-24” apart. Only water the plants if they are wilting; the snowmelt and spring rains are often sufficient moisture. Roots are shallow, so weed carefully. Harvest pods when young, crisp and tender. Pick often, and plants will produce for several weeks. Older peas become bitter, and pods turn tough.

 

Beans

Sow seeds indoors 2-3 weeks before the last frost. Direct seed in the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plant in full sun. Bush Beans: Sow seeds 1” deep, 4-6” apart, and arrange rows 2-3′ apart. Beans will mature all at the same time and must be harvested immediately. A second or third harvest will happen 1-2 weeks later. Beans left more than two days on the bush after ripening become bitter and tough. Pole Beans: Sow seeds 1” deep in mounds along a trellis or wall, with 3-4 seeds in each. Place mounds 6” apart. Always set up trellis before planting to avoid disturbing roots. Harvest beans as they become ripe, picking them every other day. Beans must be picked when ripe for optimal flavor.

Cauliflower

Start seeds indoors 4-6 weeks before last expected frost. Plant 1/2” deep in individual containers. Transplant to garden 2-4 weeks before the last frost; cauliflower needs cool weather, waiting any longer may negatively affect head growth. Place plants 18-24” apart in rows spaced 2′ apart. Plant in full sun. Cover plants during frosts.

Water 2” every week. When heads reach 2-3” diameter, blanch them by securing the outer leaves around the head with a rubber band to keep light out. In 7-12 days, they are ready for harvesting. Heads should be 6-8” diameter, compact, and firm. Small heads, or opened up heads, will not improve and can be harvested immediately.

 

Beets

Direct-seed outdoors when the soil temperature is above 50F, and there is no danger of frost. Beets are cold-hardy and can survive light freezing temperatures and some frost. Always direct-seed to ensure proper root growth. Sow seeds 1/2” deep, 1-2” apart, in rows 2” apart. Thin the seedlings to 3-4” apart once they are 2” tall. Never pull up seedlings during thinning, as this may negatively effect the ones you are retaining. Pinch or snip them off at the base. Harvest in 40-50 days, or sooner for tender, baby beets.

 

Peppers

Direct-seed outdoors when the soil temperature is above 50F, and there is no danger of frost. Beets are cold-hardy and can survive light freezing temperatures and some frost. Always direct-seed to ensure proper root growth. Sow seeds 1/2” deep, 1-2” apart, in rows 2” apart. Thin the seedlings to 3-4” apart once they are 2” tall. Never pull up seedlings during thinning, as this may negatively effect the ones you are retaining. Pinch or snip them off at the base. Harvest in 40-50 days, or sooner for tender, baby beets.

 

Summer Squash & Zucchini

Start seeds indoors 2-4 weeks before the last frost or direct-seed when the soil temperature is above 60F. Plant in full sun. Indoor starts: Plant seeds 1″ deep and 2-3″ apart. Move to individual containers when seedlings are 2-3″ tall. Transplant when all danger of frost has passed, spacing plants 2-3′ apart. Direct seed 1″ deep, in rows 2-3′ apart. Plants are large and need adequate space. Water consistently, at least 1” per week, or fruit will be bitter. Harvest fruits when young; larger squash becomes seedy, and flavor diminishes. Check every day once it starts producing. They grow quickly.

 

Carrots

Plant seeds in early spring or fall when the weather is cool. Do not start indoors; carrots do not transplant well. Plant in full sun. Sow seeds 3-5 weeks before the last frost. Broadcast seeds in rows 3” apart. When the seedlings are 2-3” tall, thin to 4” apart to ensure each root has enough space to grow. Crowded carrot plants produce skinny or stunted crops. Seedlings are slow starters, taking upwards of 3 weeks to germinate. Water consistently. Dry soil crust is difficult for the seedlings to break through. Weed carefully and diligently, so carrots do not have to compete for nutrients. Use scissors to cut the tops of weeds off, as pulling them up may pull up the carrots as well.

 

Kale & Collards

Direct-seed outdoors as soon as the ground can be worked. Soil temperature should not exceed 70F. Plant in full sun. Broadcast seeds 1/4” deep in rows 1-2′ apart. When the seedlings reach 2-3” tall, thin them to 15-18” apart. Harvest when leaves reach 4-5”. Take individual leaves, starting from the outer sides or crop the entire head. They will grow back continuously with consistent harvesting. Large leaves turn bitter. Do another planting in late-summer for a fall and winter harvest. Plants are generally frost-hardy, and kale may last through winter.

 

 

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